Last week we discussed some of the common scams happening in East Texas right now. You can access that here. But here's the problem with scams: It's like "whack-a-mole." As soon as you learn about one, two more pop up in it's place. The best solution is to know some of the signs for which to look. That way, when another one inevitably pops up you'll be more likely to discern the attempt to deceive you.

Now some scams are easier to detect than others. Obviously if a "prince" from a foreign province offers to send you millions of dollars in exchange for < insert thing here >, you can probably perceive that's a load of bull.

Unfortunately scam artists are working diligently to get better at fooling you. (Lovely, huh?) :/ So we have to be more savvy, too. Here's some things to be on the lookout for, thanks to the experts at Consumer Reports:

Enter your number to get our free mobile app

Often, scam artists try to create fear in you. I just got an almost threatening email this week from a group claiming to represent the U.S. Government. I bet you've seen one or two of these. Or maybe it's from the "IRS" or another government agency. They may threaten you with fees if you don't contact them and give them the info they need.

Strange attachments to the email. You know the ones I mean. The email may express the urgency of you opening their email ASAP to avoid < whatever they're threatening you with >. These attachments contain damaging malware that can wreak havoc on your computer. Alternatively, it may give them access to your personal files. DON'T click it. If you want to make sure, hover your mouse over the attachment so the full address will be revealed. Bottom line: don't open an email attachment you weren't already expecting to receive.

Another HUGE sign you're dealing with scammers? Misspellings in the address. Again, you can hover your mouse over it to double check the full address. If it seems off, it most likely is--don't open it.

Stay safe, my friend.