When we gather together during the holidays, we seek to put forward our very best. We plan for weeks, we create amazing food, we make our homes and hearts extra sparkly, and do our best to be as kind to one another as possible. Now, it may not always work out that way—but for many of us, we try. 😊

We also may do this during birthdays, certainly at weddings, and other “official” family gatherings. Humans long for rituals and ways to set these “special” days apart. But why not seek to do this all year long?

Obviously, most of us can’t afford nor is it feasible or advisable to make every single day a gift-giving eating frenzy. At the same time, every day is, in a way a celebration. Time is the most precious resource we have. When moments are gone, we don’t get them back, save in memory.

However, this need for ritual never leaves us. Even on the random Tuesdays in March, we still long and are lifted by these. This is one of the reasons why church or temple services, or group gatherings, can mean so much to people.

We spend so much time perfecting the fewest of days. For many, we wait to experience “living” until one of these few special days rolls around. What does that mean about the rest of our hours? Are they ordinary? Do we just toss them aside?

What if we did our best to elevate the daily things we do? There’s nothing unusual about sharing meals with friends and family. Could we remember that these, too, are celebrations?

Now, some times we can see this as something to stress and fuss over which misses the point completely. This isn’t about exhausting ourselves in order to pretend we live picture perfect lives. It is saying that, today, tomorrow, and as many days as we can, we will do our best to be our best and to cherish the moments we share those we love.

Every day is a celebration.