We talked last week about how starting on September 10, the numbered date will read the same forwards and backwards, otherwise known as a palindrome.

  • 9-10-19
  • 9-11-19
  • 9-12-19
  • 9-13-19
  • 9-14-19
  • 9-15-19
  • 9-16-19
  • 9-17-19
  • 9-18-19
  • 9-19-19

On Thursday, September 19, the last day of the palindrome, another special event will happen twice.

  • 9:19:19 a.m. / p.m.

Yeah, it will be 9 a.m. or p.m., 19 minutes, 19 seconds on 9-19-19. It's silly and simple, we get it, but it will make a nice screenshot from your phone for your Facebook or Instagram or whatever other social media you post to.

If you need a refresher on what a palindrome is, here is the definition according to palindromelist.net:

Palindrome: a word, phrase, number, or other sequence of symbols or elements, whose meaning may be interpreted the same way in either forward or reverse direction. Famous examples include "Amore, Roma", "A man, a plan, a canal: Panama" and "No ‘x’ in ‘Nixon". Composing literature in palindromes is an example of constrained writing. The word “palindrome” was coined from the Greek roots palin (“again”) and dromos (“way, direction”) by the English writer Ben Jonson in the 17th century.

Some simpler examples also include "mom", "dad" or "noon". There are some much more complicated words than that but you get the idea.