Nick Mason's aim was clear when he assembled Saucerful of Secrets in 2018: Celebrate the early music he made with Pink Floyd.

There’s almost no chance of a reunion of the group’s surviving members, but both Roger Waters and David Gilmour have continued to reference material from 1973’s The Dark Side of the Moon and onward in their solo tours. Mason brought together Pink Floyd collaborator Guy Pratt on bass and Spandau Ballet’s Gary Kemp on guitar and vocals to ensure the material that came before is remembered too.

Mason spoke to UCR 's Alex Kluft at the opening of Pink Floyd exhibition Their Mortal Remains at the Vogue Multicultural Museum in L.A., where he named his favorite item on display. “I tend to always look at my drum kit, from 1972-73, which I still think looks great, and actually sounds great,” he said.

You can see dozens of photos from Pink Floyd's Their Mortal Remains exhibit below.

The exhibition, which runs through Jan. 9, is described as an “audiovisual and musical journey through the extraordinary universe of one of the most iconic and influential rock bands.” It was hailed as “almost as good as seeing the band live” during its earlier run in London. “I think it compares really well,” Mason said of the L.A. edition. “I think this venue is really nicely suited to it. It some ways, it’s actually better set up to make it work.”

He couldn’t offer a detailed update on Pink Floyd’s highly anticipated Animals reissue, but Mason admitted it was “long overdue” but that they’d “get there eventually.” Meanwhile, he was happier to discuss the chance of continuing his early-days project with more Saucerful of Secrets shows in the U.S.

“I’m absolutely determined,” Mason asserted. “All of the band’s really anxious to get back to playing, back to work. We really miss it, actually, the business of playing live. It’s just the best part of the whole industry.”

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