Jack Stallard is a walking inspiration. If you set a resolution to shed some weight this year, this story is one you want to read.

A year ago, Jack weighed in at 403 lbs. He had been to the doctor for a kidney infection and left with a few more diagnoses. According to his recent column in the Longview News-Journal, he left with type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure and high cholesterol.

Thought he jokingly compares this trip to the doctor to a trip to the quickie lube, where he just wanted an oil change, but left with 'a new fuel filter, air filter and windshield wiper blades', Jack realized it was time for a change.

He told WFFA Reporter Jack Reece, "That was my come to Jesus. I had a little chat with myself and decided that if I want to stick around a little bit I’d better do something,” Stallard said. “And that’s it. Honestly, that next day I started."

He describes his decision to make a change, and states plainly in his column that there really is no excuse not to improve your health.

"The first thing I did was have a brutally honest chat with myself, and if you want to follow a similar path, I urge you to look in the mirror and have the same conversation.

Don't hold back. Don't be nice. Be honest and realize that unless a doctor has told you not to exercise due to medical reasons, you're just lazy. You aren't too busy, and you aren't too tired.

You simply don't want to be healthy badly enough to get off the couch and do something about it."

His story continues with small victories. What began as a trip up and down the driveway each day, has turned into 1,200 miles in just a year. He also changed his diet. He took a common sense approach, and had the discipline to stick to it. He's lost 110 lbs, and received the OK from his doctor to cease all his medications.

"In fact, I did away with all sweets. I also put away the frying pan and broke out the grill. Fruits and veggies became my new burger and fries."

He shares what he calls 'little victories,' as well. Jack can now drive his wife's Volkswagen Beetle. He can attend theater presentations, and not fear the size of the seats. He can park his truck without worrying if someone will park too close him.

His journey is one of tough love with oneself. He says,

"Mostly, though, I got my lazy carcass off the couch."