According to KTBS in Shreveport, over the weekend, twin toddlers, just shy of their fourth birthday, got into their parents truck and succumbed to the heat. This is every parent's worst nightmare.

But yet, we hear these stories summer after summer.

How hot can it get inside your car after sitting in the sun? I went to noheatstroke.org to find some answers.

  • On an 85 degree day, in ten minutes the temperature can rise to 104 degrees.
  • On a 95 degree day, in thirty minutes, the temperature can rise to 129 degrees.

You can see more from the graph below.

noheatstroke.org

Not only is this dangerous for children and adults, but also pets.

So what are some ways to prevent these very preventable incidents?

  • Never leave a child unattended in your vehicle.
  • If you see an unattended child in a hot vehicle, call 911.
  • Always lock your vehicle at home and make sure your children do not have access to your keys.
  • Make it a routine to always check your vehicle when you arrive at home, work or anywhere for that matter.

If you recall back in 2011, East Texas was under a massive heat wave. Somewhere in the neighborhood of two consecutive months, temperatures were above 100 degrees. As an experiment, I placed cookies in my car, with a thermometer, to demonstrate the heat build up throughout the day. Here was the final result.

Temperatures and humidity will increase as we go through the week. Watch out for your kiddos and your pets. If you know someone that may not have adequate cooling in their home, be sure to check on them as well.

If you work outside, hydration is extremely important. Drink water before you go out, drink water while you're out and drink water when you're done. Also, take as many breaks as possible to cool down.

Be safe my friends, the summer heat has only just begun.